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Author Topic: What is the trade off for the advantages of a Panga?  (Read 10070 times)
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wra22
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« on: December 07, 2010, 06:39:46 PM »

I am totally new to boating.  I fish from a kayak but am getting older and am thinking about the next phase. It seems all boats are trade offs.  If it runs shallow it does not do well in rough seas etc.  The panga interests me because it seems inexpensive (relatively) to run and seems to be used in very shallow water as well as off shore.  What is the trade off?  Why do people chose a deep v hull or a poling skiff instead of a panga?  Any insight is appreciated. 
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beavis
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« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2010, 02:55:24 AM »

Trade offs, hmmm....
Speaking from running my 18 skiff.
For shallow water, the high bow can be blown around by the wind.  This can be a pain when you are poling from the back by yourself.  A lot of the time I fish by myself so I pole from the bow. Naturally I can't pole as fast but the boat is very easy to control then and there is less noise usually.  I pole a lot in Mosquito Lagoon. The limit with my skiff and poling is 8 inches deep which is plenty to get into most places and I have measured that on several occasions. I still use my kayak paddle sometimes to move the boat around though. In terms of offshore. Since the delta pad runs all the way back to the transom losing the sharp entry angle, you can split waves easily but landing is rough. So in seas you have to slow down a bit in order to make to tolerable. In 2-3 foot seas I can still maintain 25 easily. Once it gets into the 4 foot range I have to slow way down in the 10-15 mph range. Trolling is not a problem in 2-4 foot seas with the occasional 5 footer thrown in.  But you are also getting better fuel mileage and needing less hp due to the delta pad.  The boats are very seaworthy in case the seas kick up while you are out. You will have to slow down and ride it out, but the boat will not let you down.
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till
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« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2010, 06:29:07 PM »

Since the delta pad runs all the way back to the transom losing the sharp entry angle, you can split waves easily but landing is rough.
So far as I get it, delta pads *start* at the transom, its just about how far forward they go. I see a lot of designs have a full-length pad and that is a bit much really. The local Southwinds have about 2.5m of pad on a 5.8m vessel which is ok.
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slickster
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« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2010, 08:48:48 PM »

The advantage of the panga style...the big bow is there is split the swell/chop, as long as it's the first thing to contact it, so the speed needs to be kept down so that happens....it's very light compared to it's length requiring low hp, easy to tow..the bow and shallow draft make it very reactive to the wind...narrow beam means a little less room, not found to be "tippy" though...need trim tabs down 99% of the time, as to an 18ft doing 25 in 2-3ft seas....yeah with no chop and a 10 second period....otherwise, just dreamin....all boats are compromises....it's basically a light, easy to power, easy to handle, rides OK at lower speeds skiff....if you aren't doing long runs where bad seas can blow up....go for it....
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beavis
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« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2010, 12:01:03 AM »

I have a tiller, so I ride in the back where it is a tad softer but a little bit wetter in some sea directions. It is fun for me and I will do it all day long. I have done it out of Ponce, Ft laud, Choko, the Keys. IMO, the boat handles it fine, even if YOU can't.  I keep a GPS with me at all times and know what my boat can handle. It is tough as nails and rock solid.

Til, And yes I know the delta doesn't start at the bow. I trying to get across about the V not being there at the transom.
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slickster
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« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2010, 10:42:51 AM »

18ft tiller boat going 25mpg in 2-3ft....unless they are very smooth without ANY chop and 10 seconds apart, you would be launching that thing into the air with the prop getting air.....as to what I can do with my 22ft....doing 25 in anything but calm water or a longer period following sea, will hurt....get real
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beavis
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« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2010, 12:00:02 AM »

Obviously 25 mph is quite fast for you. But it is not to me. The boat handles it very easily. Everyone's tolerance of what they handle is different.  Apparently yours is on the bottom of the scale and mine is on the top.  Like I said about the guy complaining about his on THT, and now over here,  you are the only person I have seen who consistantly whines about his boat. 
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till
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« Reply #7 on: December 17, 2010, 05:16:55 AM »

A few hundred pounds of crap, ie; net & fish, up the bow really helps the ride in most pangas.
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slickster
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« Reply #8 on: December 17, 2010, 10:31:24 PM »

Not whining about it, just expressing the facts.....panga owners say stuff like...."rides GREAT in all conditions"..."incredible fuel economy"...."very dry"...."I do 25mph in 2-3ftr's in my 18ft tiller boat"...LOL......my 22 PM...IMO....does none of those things...the best mpg I ever got was 4mpg no matter how I adjusted the attitude, minimal weight in boat, not a throttle jockey.... the ride in a 2ft head sea SUCKS at anything over 20 mph....the OP wanted to know about panga advantages....my old twin vee 19 performed alot better...get real....
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Walt
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« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2010, 06:20:42 PM »

Slickster: What year PM and model are you using? Motor? Trim tabs?

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slickster
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« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2011, 03:15:05 PM »

09 PM marquesas with yammie 115, tabs most of the time....very well made, gets lots of comments at the ramp...as to whether it can "do all things on the water well"....not so much....it is what it is....a light, easily pushed, narrow beam, nearly flat bottom skiff with a big bow with some flare....I was out 65 miles last week and caught 2 nice hoo....PERFECT weather day though....165 mile day, burned 40 gal.....Mick
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Walt
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« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2011, 07:55:47 AM »

Slickster,:  My performance is is right on par with yours. In 2-3' seas I cruise @ 20-22 mph.  Depending on the wave frequency,  the ride can vasilate from good to a bit uncomfortable, but certainly manageable. My biggest nemisis is following seas.

I have an 05 Marquesa with an F115 Yamaha. We do alot of fishing and diving, and sometimes make it 35+ miles offshore. 

There are alot of boats that I would rather own than my Panga, BUT:  I can't afford them. I couldn't afford fuel for them. I couldn't afford a tow vehicle for them. I couldn't afford the maintenance on them, and I don't have space to store it.  My 22' Panga does everything I like to do, and is so cheap to operate, I can do it as often as the weather permits.   

I'm very happy with my  boat, and if I were buying a boat today, I would buy the same thing I have.

Walt
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slickster
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« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2011, 08:49:24 PM »

Walt....glad to hear that you like  your PM...I also like the all-round economy of the boat, easy to tow and run, easy clean-up...runs fast enough with a 115hp...in a following sea I take some tab out and try to keep the bow from getting buried in the swell, slowing the boat and getting us wet....all boat designs are compromises for sure....there isn't a boat that runs 35mpg in 4ft seas that weighs 3000lbs, runs with a 100hp, goes in 12 inches of water and costs 10K$....I just believed too much hype about the panga design, I was expecting a better ride in typical offshore conditions.....the ride is manageable at slower speeds, but getting 50 miles out at 15-18 mph isn't realistic...I did get a seatrial before I bought, but it was really flat that day...the 4 mpg at best was also somewhat disappointing....some guys claim 5-7 mpg on occasion...I have put 265 hrs on it in 18 months....where do you run your panga?
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Walt
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« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2011, 05:55:47 AM »

I live in Bradenton.  I dont'  like MPG , I prefer GPH.   I'm burning 4-5 GPH @ cruise (4000-4500 RPM)   The speed @ that RPM range differs depending on which prop I'm running.  I'm currently using a 14 pitch thats great for shallow water, but the top end sucks.  The only time I really miss the faster prop is when it's flat offshore (doesn't happen often).
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slickster
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« Reply #14 on: January 04, 2011, 02:11:47 PM »

Bradenton is one of my favorite places in all of FL....a panga is a great boat for that side....the gulf typically doesn't have the larger swell we get in the atlantic...I did put a whale tail on the lower unit, it pops up on plane and will hold plane at 13 mph....the bow is alot more stable underway...I lost a little top end but I rarely run it above 30 anyway....happy boating....
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