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Author Topic: Oars as emergency power source  (Read 1873 times)
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ron
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« on: October 28, 2016, 05:51:22 PM »

I have been considering putting some oars on a 23 foot panga as an emergency source of power. Anybody ever do this? I could use some help placing the oar locks, choosing oars etc. Thanks, Ron
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trip
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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2016, 05:17:01 AM »

May cost a little more but it would be a lot easier to hang a 10 hp on the back and take up a lot less room.   Cool
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ron
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« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2016, 12:20:58 PM »

I figure I have 3 options, oars, small kicker, or a sail. Not being a sailor and preferring things simple I am leaning toward oars. Problem is I am not sure moving a 23 foot panga with oars is practical so I would like to hear from people that have done it. Thanks for your input.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2016, 12:22:36 PM by ron » Logged
Capt Brennan
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« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2016, 07:10:13 AM »

I will relate two stories regarding an the use of n auxiliary engine that I have experienced.  Many years ago, a buddy of mine and I were in the Keys.  We had just passed under one of the bridges when the main engine quit.  "No worries," he says' I have a spare motor forward we can drag out and use. 1/2 hour later, after mounting it and finally getting it started (it was somewhat neglected) we're now about a mile from the bridge.  Spent the next couple of hours motoring against the tide, until the tide changed and we made it home.

Yesterday, I was checking out the Matanzas inlet after the storm, with no intention of going through, yet.  There was a heavy outgoing tide and I decided to turn around before going under the bridge.  To my surprise I was still being swept towards the bridge and was in danger of being smashed against the bridge pileings. I safely made it out of there but my Etec 115 was at 2500 rpm's just to make headway against the outgoing current.

In my humble opinion, if you feel you have to have a spare, I would go with twins, each capable of planeing out a boat individually. Twice as expensive and twice the maintenance of a single engine, but you have usable redundancy.  Myself, I use a well maintained single engine. So far, knock on wood, I've not had problems.  There are many other things besides an engine failure that can ruin your day, dead batteries, bad fuel, leaking hydraulic system, spun prop, etc. etc.  My advise is to maintain your entire vessel like your life depends on it, because it does.
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Captain Mike Brennan
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« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2016, 07:41:46 AM »

I have to agree with Capt. Brennan on this one.

The complications of storing, deploying and maintaining a small outboard for emergencies far outweighs the risk in my opinion. 

Get a sea tow subscription, buy a nice anchor, and if you will be outside of radio or cell invest in a Sat phone. Another thing I will do if im going to be a couple miles off the beach is always plan for an overnight. Pack a bag with some food, gallon of emergency water, and a long sleeve non cotton shirt.  I also just added a bug net that you put over your head and a small tarp that can be pitched between the T-top and the front cleat to get out of the elements. All this can be put in a small duffle and thrown in a hatch easily.
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ron
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« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2016, 01:47:30 PM »

Thanks for the input I do appreciate it. I have a larger boat I take out to the Channel Islands, they are 25 miles off the coast of California. I have been towed in twice from there, both mechanical failures that weren't from lack of maintenance. After that I put a kicker on that boat and have come in on it three times and none of those were from the lack of maintenance. Kickers as a backup do work but bad fuel will take both motors out unless you have a redundant known good fuel supply. Where I go with the panga you are on your own, no one will hear your radio, a SAT phone would work assuming you had power and a long time to wait for rescue. What I really need is some help with mounting oars, I might not be able to buck the current but I could probably miss the bridge.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2016, 05:09:30 PM by ron » Logged
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